I think anything about NUTRITION are great

Today I do a part two to my climate change Cheat Sheet I did up a few weeks ago. The debate continues, louder, more urgent, daily. I aim to alarm us all. Sorry. Not. Sorry. The alarm is real.

This article in the New Yorker points to something I fear like nothing else – the most viable solution presented by some scientists to being able to continue human life beyond the next 100 years is to… move to Mars. I rail against this. We belong here on earth. We are symbiotically connected. The beauty of the planet is my source of truest joy, its vastness feeds my spiritual innocence. I’d take a bullet for it. Which is to say I’d rather die than go to Mars. I weep right here, as I bang this out,thinking of how disconnected the folk who even suggest such an idea as a hopeful solution (and throw billions at its pursuit over shutting down carbon emissions). Where have our souls gone? Where is our awe at?

It points out a few digestible facts amid a wonderful broader treatise. I like to reduce things to snapshots, to invite you to read the rest.

  • The world is going backwards even in areas where we’d made progress (with world hunger and child labour, for instance):

Late in 2017, a United Nations agency announced that the number of chronically malnourished people in the world, after a decade of decline, had started to grow again—by 38 million, to a total of 815 million…and child labor, after years of falling, was growing.”

Both are due to climate-induced disasters.

  • CO2 emissions are going through the roof, such that:

The extra heat that we trap near the planet every day (my emphasis) is equivalent to the heat from four hundred thousand bombs the size of the one that was dropped on Hiroshima.

As a result, in the past thirty years we’ve seen all twenty of the hottest years ever recorded.

  • The writer a few months back visited Greenland, where he took a boat to a glacier on a nearby fjord.

As we made our way across a broad bay, I glanced up at the electronic chart above the captain’s wheel, where a blinking icon showed that we were a mile inland. The captain explained that the chart was from five years ago, when the water around us was still ice.

  • We have already managed to kill off 60 per cent of the world’s wildlife since 1970.
  • The most startling thing is the historical background he gives to why the warnings have been ignored for 30 years. First, industry intervention in Government policy saw a concerted campaign to spread the message that there is no climate change consensus. This is bullshit. But the campaign has worked.

In 2017, polls found that almost ninety per cent of Americans did not know that there was a scientific consensus on global warming.

  • Sickeningly, Exxon has almost singlehandedly fucked us. They got hold of the science, acknowledged the warning signs were legit and then…

They used (the science) to figure out how low their drilling costs in the Arctic would eventually fall. Had Exxon and its peers passed on what they knew to the public, geological history would look very different today. The problem of climate change would not be solved, but the crisis would, most likely, now be receding.

Did we all get that? Fossil-fuel companies have been allowed to determine whether we survive as a species, save migrating to Mars. Many of you (and I too) are despairing. What can be done. The writer arrives at the only conclusion I’m seeing among informed voices like his – we have to stand up to it. Protest. With all our gusto.

We are on a path to self-destruction, and yet there is nothing inevitable about our fate. Solar panels and wind turbines are now among the least expensive ways to produce energy. Storage batteries are cheaper and more efficient than ever. We could move quickly if we chose to, but we’d need to opt for solidarity and coördination on a global scale….The possibility of swift change lies in people coming together in movements large enough to shift the Zeitgeist.

To this end, the writer Bill McKibben is founder of the grassroots climate campaign 350.org.

 

***

 

While you’re there I recommend you read this by George Monbiot (read anything by George Monbiot if you want to stay woke). This grazed my heart – a young woman raises her hand at a conference at which he was speaking after a suggestion was made to find some softer, intermediate aim to the advice that CO2 emissions are reduced to zero by 2025 (which by now you’d know is really a bare minimum solution to a crises bigger than we can imagine).

“What is it that you are asking me as a 20-year-old to face and to accept about my future and my life? … This is an emergency. We are facing extinction. When you ask questions like that, what is it you want me to feel?” We had no answer.

Monbiot admits she’s right:

Softer aims might be politically realistic, but they are physically unrealistic. Only shifts commensurate with the scale of our existential crises have any prospect of averting them. Hopeless realism, tinkering at the edges of the problem, got us into this mess. It will not get us out.

  • He points to the ingenuity argument (possibly the only argument of hope I’ve been convinced by) – that we humans are great at fixing problems when we put our minds to it:

When the US joined the second world war in 1941, it replaced a civilian economy with a military economy within months. As Jack Doyle records in his book Taken for a Ride, “In one year, General Motors developed, tooled and completely built from scratch 1,000 Avenger and 1,000 Wildcat aircraft … Barely a year after Pontiac received a navy contract to build anti-shipping missiles, the company began delivering the completed product to carrier squadrons around the world.” And this was before advanced information technology made everything faster.

  • But bear in mind, the issue is our obsession with growth…which depends entirely on resources.

While 50bn tonnes of resources used per year is roughly the limit the Earth’s systems can tolerate, the world is already consuming 70bn tonnes. At current rates of economic growth, this will rise to 180bn tonnes by 2050.

Which brings me, as always, back to my radical response. Stop consuming. Please. Happy Black Friday.

The post The earth is in a death spiral. Happy Black Friday, hey. appeared first on Sarah Wilson.

Anything about NUTRITION is very important

Super Bowl Snacks Recipes

I don’t normally share my google search history, but this one pretty much sums up everything I know about sports:

“When does the Super Bowl start?”
“Who is playing in the Super Bowl?
“Is Super Bowl one word or two?”

I do know a thing or two about food, though, so when game day rolls around I “participate” by making a few snacks. They’re equally delicious for true fans and those of us who aren’t paying attention to the screen at all. If you’re gearing up for game day this weekend and want to make real food versions of your tried-and-true favorites, give these recipes a try!

jalapeno poppers recipe

Jalapeno Poppers

Stuffed with cream cheese and cheddar, sprinkled with smoked paprika, and rolled up in bacon, these jalapeno poppers are simple to make and so delicious!

buffalo-wings-recipe-oven

Buffalo Wings

Spicy and smokey and perfect for dipping in homemade ranch dressing,  this buffalo wings recipe is one of my husbands favorite movie night/game day indulgences.

cauliflower pizza crust recipe

Cauliflower Crust Pizza

This simplified cauliflower pizza crust doesn’t require any pre-cooking, steaming, squeezing, or double back-handsprings. It takes only a few minutes of hands-on time and holds together beautifully!

salsa recipe

Restaurant-Style Salsa

This salsa recipe is easy to make and hard to resist. It’s bright, fresh flavor reminds me of my favorite childhood Tex-Mex restaurant. Link to my new favorite paleo tortilla chips in the post!

real food chocolate chip cookie recipe for game day snacks

Chocolate Chip Cookies

These chocolate chip cookies are grain-free and super chewy even without the addition of an egg, so if you run out of time in the kitchen just toss the dough on the living room table and let them dive in.

almond butter cups recipe

Salted Chocolate Almond Butter Cups

Love Reese’s peanut butter cups but not the corn syrup solids, nonfat milk and tertiary butylhydroquinone Here’s a recipe for a healthy homemade version.

Fudgy Brownie Recipe

Rich and chewy, these fudgy brownies are one of my favorite recipes from Danielle of Against All Grain‘s most recent book.

Other Favorites

This queso dip from Food Renegade is pure awesomeness. Serve it with organic corn chips, grain-free tortilla chips or  homemade tortillas. If you want to skip the canned diced tomatoes and green chilies, make it from scratch using this recipe.

What’s your favorite game day snack?

Continue reading Real Food Snack Recipes For Game Day

Tremendous very informative

Whether your trip is for work or play, the struggle is real when it comes to keeping up with a workout routine during travel. Between seedy hotel gyms (or no hotel gym at all), laborious research for a local yoga class, and Googling safe run routes in a new city, the very thought of working out in foreign territory can be exhausting.

The good news is that—assuming you actually want to work out—you can squeeze in a sweat session from your Airbnb or hotel room without much logistical effort at all. These seven pieces of equipment are easy to throw in your car or slip into your carry-on for on-the-go workouts, wherever your travels are taking you.

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Simply Fit Resistance Bands


Simply Fit Resistance Bands
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We regularly shout our love for resistance bands from the mountaintops. They’re affordable, lightweight, and an ultra-effective way to add resistance into your workout (in even the tiniest hotel rooms). No clue what to do with these magical oversized rubber bands? Grab a set—we love these from Fit Simplify—and check out our list of resistance band strength-training exercises.

($11; amazon.com)

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Elite Core Sliders


Elite Core Sliders
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Don’t be fooled—sliders are pretty unassuming, but they pack a real punch by challenging your stability and core strength during bodyweight workouts. This set is double-sided, so they’re nice and slidey on both hardwood and carpeted floors. Plus, they’re lightweight, flat, and take up basically zero space at the bottom of your suitcase or carry-on bag. Not many excuses left, huh?

($10; amazon.com)

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Fitness Masters Jump Rope


Fitness Masters Jump Rope
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If you’re trying to keep up with your cardio routine while traveling, keep a jump rope handy. Just a 10-minute workout with a rope (like this one from Fitness Master) creates a calorie-burning cardio session that you can take just about anywhere. Unless, of course, your hotel room has hardwood floors—then take it outside so you don’t drive the people below you bananas with your jumping.

While jumping rope is a killer workout, it’s a lot of impact on your joints. Make sure to tag on a warm-up and cool down to get the most out of your workout.

($10; amazon.com)

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GHB Pro Agility Ladder


GHB Pro Agility Ladder
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A flat and foldable agility ladder (like this one from GHB Pro) is one of the easiest pieces of athletic equipment you can find—just lay it out on the floor or in the grass and channel your inner pro athlete. Yes, it’s great for targeting your lower body and improving your speedwork. But most importantly, training on an agility ladder is basically like playing grown-up hopscotch, so it’s actually pretty fun.

($12; amazon.com)

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Kamagon Water Kettlebell


Kamagon Water Kettlebell
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No access to a gym while you’re traveling? Check out these portable double-handled kettlebells from Kamagon. They fill with water or sand to weigh anywhere from 2 to 13 pounds and deflate for easy travel. So go ahead and take your kettlebell routine to the beach with you—unless, you know, you want to actually relax on your vacation.

($43; amazon.com)

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Gaiam Foldable Yoga Mat


Gaiam Foldable Yoga Mat
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For the suitcase real estate value of a chunky sweater, you can bring your yoga practice to wherever your travels take you. This lightweight, foldable travel mat from Gaiam is great to have on hand for all of your horizontal workout needs. So the next time you’re feeling homesick for your favorite studio, pop on a free yoga video and flow it out.

($20; amazon.com)

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The best health and fitness apps


The best health and fitness apps
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7. An Endless List of Apps and Streaming Programs

Last but certainly not least, check out our favorite workout apps and streaming services—some require little to no equipment, and some are totally free, so keeping yourself motivated when you’re away from home has truly never been easier.

Every editorial product is independently selected by our editors or writers. If you buy something through one of our links, we may earn a commission. But don’t worry, it doesn’t cost you anything extra, and we wouldn’t recommend a product if we didn’t love it as much as we love puppies.

Nina Bahadur is a freelance writer, editor, and consultant based in NYC.

posts about BEING HEALTHY are why everyone loves your page

Ingredients:

1/2 teaspoon turmeric

1/3 teaspoon cumin

1/3 teaspoon dried oregano

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 dried bay leaf

1 large yellow onion – diced

4 cloves of garlic – minced

5 small or 2 large carrots – diced

3 pieces of celery with leaves – diced

1 green pepper – diced

1 12 ounce can diced tomatoes

1 chipotle pepper in adobo sauce – seeded and minced

4 cups of vegetable or chicken broth

1 cup black beans – cooked

1 cup pinto beans – cooked

1 cup kidney beans – cooked

Salt and pepper to tasteOptional Garnish:1 Avocado

Parsley

Dollop of créme fresh

Sprinkle of Mexican Cheese

Steps/Methods:

Heat olive oil, turmeric, cumin and oregano in a large pot for two minutes on medium heat. Add in onions and garlic and cook for a few minutes (do not brown). Throw in carrots, celery, green pepper and bay leaf and cook for another ten minutes. If the vegetables are sticking to the bottom of the pan, add a little water. Once veggies are soft, add in diced tomatoes, vegetable or chicken broth and chipotle pepper. Bring to a boil and then simmer for about 45 minutes. Then, add the beans and simmer for another 15-20 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve with your favourite chili toppings.

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The post Vegan Chili appeared first on NaturallySavvy.com.